St Joseph’s honours and celebrates its staff: Meeting challenges of COVID 19 in caring for its vulnerable patients.

Today St Joseph’s Home for Chronically Ill Children celebrates and honors its more than 130 staff who are all committed to making a difference since the COVID 19 lockdown started. While our gates are closed for visitors, donors, and friends, our hearts remain open and we believe we have been called to serve, protect and care for the patients in our wards.  Thank you to all our clinical, operational, admin and resource development staff!

Every April 7, the World Health Organization chooses to highlight a special theme current in the wellness and medical world. Ranging from mental health to insurance and everything in between, this day sets the tone for what’s to come in the world stage. This year’s World Health Day will shine a light on nurses and midwives, the on-the-call, restless workforce that revolutionized the healthcare industry as we know it today.

World Health Day, was created in December 1945, when officials of Brazil and China proposed the creation of an international health organization, that is all-encompassing and absolutely independent from any government powers.

Half a year later, in New York, in July 1946, the constitution of the World Health Organization was approved. Said constitution entered into force on April 7, 1948, as 61 countries signed in agreement for the inception of the NGO.

As one of the first official acts of WHO, they created the celebration of World Health Day. It was first observed on July 22, 1949, but the date was later changed to April 7, the establishment of WHO, to encourage student participation.

Since 1950, the Worth Health Day uses a different theme and theme each year selected by the current WHO Director-General, based on the suggestions of the member governments and staff.
World Health Day provides a global opportunity to focus attention on important public health issues that affect the international community. On the occasion of World Health Day, promotional programs are launched that continue for a long time after April 7.

World Health Day 2020 will shine a light on the vital role played by nurses and midwives in providing health care around the world, where advocacy events will be held around the world, including the launch of the first-ever State of the World’s Nursing Report, which will provide planning to optimize the contributions of the nursery workforce, with a similar report on the Midwifery workforce to be done in 2021.

Source: World Health Day

 

Nurses Day 2019 (Below)

Pallottine Order pays tribute to Sister Anne-Marie

1st of February 2020 is a day that the Pallottine Family and people of Cape Town, South Africa will always remember. It was a day when many people of different faiths, races and professions, gathered in St. Vincent Pallotti Convent to say goodbye to their dear Sister Annemarie Niehsen, a German Missionary, who after her 52 years of life and service in South Africa returned to her homeland. They came to express their gratitude, friendship and appreciation for her tireless service in the hospital as a sister for all, for her fidelity to the Lord and love for our Founder St. Vincent Pallotti through living her religious vows, ministry and her dedication in building a better world and future.

Archbishop Stephen Brislin, the Auxiliary Bishop Sylvester David, Pallottine and Diocesan Priests celebrated together with the assembly a thanksgiving Mass for Sr. Annemarie’s intentions. In his introduction, Archbishop Stephen expressed words of gratitude toward Sr. Annemarie and recalled a few stories from his encounters with her and the people. He said: she had a great love and compassion for all the people, especially those in the hospital, whom she served.  She was gentle, smiling, always available, always at their service. Bishop Sylvester David, in his homily, recalling the saint of the day St. Benedict Daswa, 1st South African Catholic saint and martyr, said that the life of religious and missionaries is often the life of martyrdom. Such moments of life in South Africa also were experienced by our Sister Annemarie. Concluding he said to Sr. Annemarie – there are some beautiful flowers that bloom only in the night and you are one of them…

Sr. Annemarie’s life was a continuous conquering and discovery of what is valuable in life, what is good, beautiful, true and eternal.  Perfectly she sensed the human and spiritual needs of the people and had the gift of listening to everyone. She has a wonderful talent of communication with others, at any time and in any place – in the church, in the shop, on the street – but the hospital was the place where she dedicated most of her time and gave her whole heart.

With her love of God, her love for people, with her missionary spirit, joy and simplicity, she changed the flow of life for many – to a beautiful journey, bringing them the light of hope and blessing.  Here, in South Africa, she created a long history that will never be forgotten…

“I know” – said Sr. Izabela Świerad, Superior General of the Pallottine Missionary Sisters to all gathered at the celebration – “that Sr. Annemarie will never be separated from this mission, from this country, from its nature, from her sisters and brothers. She will carry her Africa with her wherever she will go. She will take the sun, the water, the warmth, the wind, and sand, the beauty of the proteas, the smile of children and tears of people, especially those who suffered. I know that she will not only miss those she loved, but she will miss herself as the person she was at this time and in this place, because she will never be this way again. The experience of these years and the memories she has made will be in her heart forever.”

Thank you, Sr. Annemarie. Having lived this way, may you one day hear the words of Jesus: “Well done, good and faithful servant! Come and share your master’s happiness!” (Mathew 25:23).

Let us give praise and thanks to our good and gracious God for the blessings that Sr. Annemarie received during all these years. Let us give thanks for the gift of the life and vocation of the many Pallottine Sisters, Brothers and Priests who worked in South Africa.

The Pallottine Missionary Sisters began their mission in South Africa in 1923, when the Pallottine Bishop and Apostolic Vicar of South Africa, Francis Hennemann invited our Sisters to come to his mission territory of Oudtshoorn. Sr. Annemarie, a young nurse, shortly after her final vows in 1968, at the age of 30 was sent to South Africa for her missionary service.  From the beginning Sister was involved as a nurse in the hospital of Pinelands, Cape Town, first called St. Joseph’s Sanatorium, which afterwards was transformed to St. Vincent Pallotti Hospital. There Sr. Annemarie served to the last day of her stay in South Africa.

Today there are two small communities of the Pallottine Missionary Sisters in South Africa: Sisters from South Africa, Germany, India, and Tanzania who desire to continue the mission of Christ marked by the life and service of our Sisters there. 108 German Pallottine Sisters and 1 South African died on South African soil.  Our Sisters today live with gratitude in the heart for the past and in hope that soon more Sisters will join from other provinces to strengthen this mission.

Article – Pallottine Website https://pallottine-missionaries-rome.com/en/here-we-are/south-africa/2890-there-are-beautiful-night-blooming-flowers-and-you-are-one-of-them

St Joseph’s Home wishes you well, Sister Annemarie!

Going back after 52 years!

St Joseph’s Home said goodbye to Sister Annemarie, Provincial Superior of the Pallottine Missionary Sisters, at the end of January prior to her return to Germany in February. She was so much appreciated and loved by all at SJH and played an active part being a board member and representing SJH at a number of fundraising meetings and events.

Sister Izabela SAC from Rome said that Sister Annemarie was due to leave in 2010, but she stayed on, and referred to her as the “Hero of the Day”.

“We started building the house (St Joseph’s) and knew that the foundation was already there. The support during those times came from late Archbishop Henry and Archbishop Brislin, while I thank Thea Patterson (director) -soon to retire- for her 18 years of service. We are all here together today and feel part of this special family. History will show your work,” she said.     

After entering the Convent: Kloster Marienborn in Limburg an der Lahn in Germany (Pallottine Missionaries) in 1958, Sister Annemarie enrolled for her Nursing Studies (1963) in Erlenbach am Main for her Professional Nursing Diploma.

In 1968 she was sent to the South African Mission in Cape Town to help the Sisters to start the new extension of St. Joseph’s Sanatorium, now Vincent Pallotti Hospital. Her responsibilities included planning and managing the operating theatres. In order to improve her English and to implement my theatre knowledge, she enrolled for a postgraduate training diploma in Operating Theatre Technique at Groote Schuur Hospital.

During her later years she started a district practice, treating and visiting patients in their homes after they had been discharged from the Vincent Pallotti Hospital.  After retirement, she continued her calling, giving pastoral support to patients at the hospital.

She will now be returning to Germany after a service of 52 years in South Africa.

“I wish you as many blessings from the Lord as you can handle,” Sister Annemarie concluded.

 

Saying goodbye to her: Chirstelle Cornelius (incoming SJH CEO), Sister Annemarie SAC, Thea Patterson (SJH Director), Adrian van Stolk (Chairman), and from Rome, Sister Izabela SAC.

 

Christelle Cornelius welcomed to St Joseph’s

The SJH director, Thea Patterson (left) welcomed Christelle Cornelius (right) to St Joseph’s. She will be taking over as new CEO when Thea retires at the end of March